Portrait Photography

Published by WPC Official on May'22,2019

0 | 720


Portrait Photography

WPC Official
0 | 720 | May 22, 2019

Portrait photography or portraiture is photography of a person or group of people that captures the personality of a subject by using effective lighting, backdrops, and poses.

 Mostly, portraits are commissioned for special occasions, such as weddings or school events.Portraits can serve many purposes, from usage on a personal website to being on display in the lobby of a business centre, etc...

Tips for good Portrait Photography

1. Alter your perspective – Try seeing people from a perspective other than the traditional in the face. It will give you different angles to look and experiment with.

2. Play with eye contact – it is not always necessary to look your subject right in the eye. Not making direct eye contact can also work.

3. Break the rules of composition – Don’t follow the traditional old route. Try to do something different. Try to experiment.

4. Experiment with lighting – Although natural light is the best, but using studio lights and reflectors can do no harm.

5. Move your subject out of their comfort zone–Try and get your subject to pose. Not in the style they want it but in the way you want them to unless of course, their way is better.

6. Shoot candidly – Group shots always work, no matter how big or small the group is. Group shots are the safer way to go but take candid shots as well. They help you go a long way and make a good portfolio too.

7. Introduce a prop–Try getting your subject to hold a prop or pose with one. Props seem weird in most situations but mostly weird turns out to be good for the picture. The prop does not always mean to get close to an object; you can ask them to blow a bubble gum and it’ll be considered equally as much a prop.

8. Focus on one body part (get up close)–Focusing on just one body part be it hands, legs, arms, eyes, one of the ear, etc… with a lens of long focal length will leave so much to the imagination and make the viewer curious.

9. An obscure part of your subject - A variation on the idea of zooming in on one part of the body is to obscure parts of your portrait subject’s face or body. You can do this with clothing, objects, their hands or just by framing part of them out of the image.

10. Take a series of photos – Don’t just stop with one click because you think it's perfect; take a series of photos and then decide. You never know, you might have created a masterpiece in one of them.

Famous Portrait Photographers around the World

1. Steve McCurry

 

Credits: www.google.com

 

2. Annie Leibovitz

 

Credits: www.tokyodandy.com

 

3. Jimmy Nelson

 

Credits: www.blankspaceblog.com

 

4. Irving Penn

 

Credits: www.erikimphotography.com

 

5. Richard Avedon

 

Credits: www.pinterest.com

 

6. David Lazar

 

Credits: www.davidlazar.com

 

7. Yousuf Karsh

 

Credits: www.pinterest.com

 

8. Mary-Ellen Mark

 

Credits: www.pinterest.com

 

9. Mario Testino

 

Credits: www.pinterest.com

 

10. Albert Watson

 

Credits: www.guyhepner.com

 

For more information on Photos & Photography, visit www.worldphotographersclub.com

Happy Shooting!

 


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Portrait photography or portraiture is photography of a person or group of people that captures the personality of a subject by using effective lighting, backdrops, and poses.

 Mostly, portraits are commissioned for special occasions, such as weddings or school events.Portraits can serve many purposes, from usage on a personal website to being on display in the lobby of a business centre, etc...

Tips for good Portrait Photography

1. Alter your perspective – Try seeing people from a perspective other than the traditional in the face. It will give you different angles to look and experiment with.

2. Play with eye contact – it is not always necessary to look your subject right in the eye. Not making direct eye contact can also work.

3. Break the rules of composition – Don’t follow the traditional old route. Try to do something different. Try to experiment.

4. Experiment with lighting – Although natural light is the best, but using studio lights and reflectors can do no harm.

5. Move your subject out of their comfort zone–Try and get your subject to pose. Not in the style they want it but in the way you want them to unless of course, their way is better.

6. Shoot candidly – Group shots always work, no matter how big or small the group is. Group shots are the safer way to go but take candid shots as well. They help you go a long way and make a good portfolio too.

7. Introduce a prop–Try getting your subject to hold a prop or pose with one. Props seem weird in most situations but mostly weird turns out to be good for the picture. The prop does not always mean to get close to an object; you can ask them to blow a bubble gum and it’ll be considered equally as much a prop.

8. Focus on one body part (get up close)–Focusing on just one body part be it hands, legs, arms, eyes, one of the ear, etc… with a lens of long focal length will leave so much to the imagination and make the viewer curious.

9. An obscure part of your subject - A variation on the idea of zooming in on one part of the body is to obscure parts of your portrait subject’s face or body. You can do this with clothing, objects, their hands or just by framing part of them out of the image.

10. Take a series of photos – Don’t just stop with one click because you think it's perfect; take a series of photos and then decide. You never know, you might have created a masterpiece in one of them.

Famous Portrait Photographers around the World

1. Steve McCurry

 

Credits: www.google.com

 

2. Annie Leibovitz

 

Credits: www.tokyodandy.com

 

3. Jimmy Nelson

 

Credits: www.blankspaceblog.com

 

4. Irving Penn

 

Credits: www.erikimphotography.com

 

5. Richard Avedon

 

Credits: www.pinterest.com

 

6. David Lazar

 

Credits: www.davidlazar.com

 

7. Yousuf Karsh

 

Credits: www.pinterest.com

 

8. Mary-Ellen Mark

 

Credits: www.pinterest.com

 

9. Mario Testino

 

Credits: www.pinterest.com

 

10. Albert Watson

 

Credits: www.guyhepner.com

 

For more information on Photos & Photography, visit www.worldphotographersclub.com

Happy Shooting!