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A Guide to Getting Protective Gear for Your Camera Equipment

Published by WPC Official Account on Mar'30,2021

0 | 1431


A Guide to Getting Protective Gear for Your Camera Equipment

WPC Official Account
0 | 1431 | Aug 03, 2021

Camera equipment can cost anywhere from $300 to upwards of $3,000. Within the lower price range, you can get older entry-level cameras like the Nikon D3400 or the Canon EOS Rebel T7, but your options widen the more you’re willing to spend. For a few thousand dollars, you can get professional full-frames like the Sony A7R III or versatile prime lenses like the Canon EF 85mm F/1.8 USM— not to mention the peripherals and specialty accessories. You’d be surprised at how much your photography setup could easily rack up huge bucks, for both professionals and hobbyists. This equipment doesn’t come cheap, so investing in protective gear is absolutely worth it.

Camera Bag


We strongly advise against carrying your camera without a bag. In our ‘Clean Gear - Hurdles Rare: A Guide to Cleaning Your Photography Gear’ article, we highlighted how cameras can be exposed to polluted air and hard surfaces when in transit outside of bags. This makes them more susceptible to damage. The selection of photography equipment on Adorama shows how most camera bags protect against the elements. If you’re going to be shooting near a body of water, for example, you could use a hard and water-sealed bag like the SKB iSeries 3I-0907-6SLR for your DSLR. When you’re shooting outdoors, and the weather could be temperamental, you can opt for a water-resistant Ape Case specific to your camera’s model. A versatile water-resistant bag could even become your everyday camera bag, as this helps protect your camera from the usual culprits of camera damage: spills, hard surfaces, and drops.

Silicone Skin


For people who want to have their cameras ready to shoot at any time, a silicone skin is a great alternative to a fitted bag or carrying case. Silicone skins help keep moisture from your camera. They also add a degree of protection and weatherproofing. This is especially useful when you’re shooting in damp environments such as the beach or in wet weather; or when you’re shooting food that could damage the camera surface.

What’s more is that these skins could help improve your grip, making it less likely for you to drop your camera— but it goes without saying that a camera strap is a must-have for handheld cameras.

Lens Cases


For lenses mounted on cameras, Shuttertalk’s list of camera protection accessories urges you to always put the lens cap back on after shooting. But when not in use, and detached from cameras, lenses are prone to falls and exposure to dust which may cause damage. So you should put them in lens cases: hard or padded.

Hard lens cases are ideal for storing lenses for long periods of time, as well as for transporting large and heavy models. These are extremely sturdy and are made to withstand tough conditions. On the other hand, padded lens cases are more malleable. Yet they still offer a decent amount of protection as most padded cases like the Lowepro Lens Case are made of thick, high-density foam with rigid outer shells.

Now that you know how to protect your equipment properly, it’s time to start shooting! Check out our Active Competitions for a chance to win amazing prizes and get your shots featured on our site.


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Camera equipment can cost anywhere from $300 to upwards of $3,000. Within the lower price range, you can get older entry-level cameras like the Nikon D3400 or the Canon EOS Rebel T7, but your options widen the more you’re willing to spend. For a few thousand dollars, you can get professional full-frames like the Sony A7R III or versatile prime lenses like the Canon EF 85mm F/1.8 USM— not to mention the peripherals and specialty accessories. You’d be surprised at how much your photography setup could easily rack up huge bucks, for both professionals and hobbyists. This equipment doesn’t come cheap, so investing in protective gear is absolutely worth it.

Camera Bag


We strongly advise against carrying your camera without a bag. In our ‘Clean Gear - Hurdles Rare: A Guide to Cleaning Your Photography Gear’ article, we highlighted how cameras can be exposed to polluted air and hard surfaces when in transit outside of bags. This makes them more susceptible to damage. The selection of photography equipment on Adorama shows how most camera bags protect against the elements. If you’re going to be shooting near a body of water, for example, you could use a hard and water-sealed bag like the SKB iSeries 3I-0907-6SLR for your DSLR. When you’re shooting outdoors, and the weather could be temperamental, you can opt for a water-resistant Ape Case specific to your camera’s model. A versatile water-resistant bag could even become your everyday camera bag, as this helps protect your camera from the usual culprits of camera damage: spills, hard surfaces, and drops.

Silicone Skin


For people who want to have their cameras ready to shoot at any time, a silicone skin is a great alternative to a fitted bag or carrying case. Silicone skins help keep moisture from your camera. They also add a degree of protection and weatherproofing. This is especially useful when you’re shooting in damp environments such as the beach or in wet weather; or when you’re shooting food that could damage the camera surface.

What’s more is that these skins could help improve your grip, making it less likely for you to drop your camera— but it goes without saying that a camera strap is a must-have for handheld cameras.

Lens Cases


For lenses mounted on cameras, Shuttertalk’s list of camera protection accessories urges you to always put the lens cap back on after shooting. But when not in use, and detached from cameras, lenses are prone to falls and exposure to dust which may cause damage. So you should put them in lens cases: hard or padded.

Hard lens cases are ideal for storing lenses for long periods of time, as well as for transporting large and heavy models. These are extremely sturdy and are made to withstand tough conditions. On the other hand, padded lens cases are more malleable. Yet they still offer a decent amount of protection as most padded cases like the Lowepro Lens Case are made of thick, high-density foam with rigid outer shells.

Now that you know how to protect your equipment properly, it’s time to start shooting! Check out our Active Competitions for a chance to win amazing prizes and get your shots featured on our site.